Archive for May, 2010

Local Transport – Time To Choose

May 20th, 2010

The  mammoth consultation on the 20 year Local Transport Plan, 2011-2030, isn’t for the faint hearted, but for those of us that have stuck the course it’s thrown up some real hope of a sea change in transport planning. The 20 year timescale was chosen to link the transport plan to the county’s Sustainable Community Strategy, 2030, in order to support it – so far so good.

» Read more: Local Transport – Time To Choose

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LTP Scenarios, Corn Exchange

May 17th, 2010

Consultation on the Local Transport Plan continues with Phase 5: Scenarios.

The Local Transport Plan is a key document when it comes to getting sustainable transport modes the priority and funding they deserve. This drop in session running on Wednesday between 5pm and 7pm at the Corn Exchange is an opportunity to see what’s going on and to ask questions.

Consultation 5 – Scenarios

LTP Newsletter

10:10 Newsflash

May 14th, 2010

The Government Signs-up to 10:10 from The1010Campaign on Vimeo.

What to do in the vegetable garden in May

May 14th, 2010

April was a very dry month in Witney and I think we only had one or two showers for the whole month. A rain gauge is very useful in helping to judge how much to water as it measures the amount of rain that reaches soil level. Mine has remained dry for much of the past month, so I’ve been out watering more often than usual.

An empty rain gauge

There hasn’t been much rain this last month!

» Read more: What to do in the vegetable garden in May

Local £99 Insulation Deal

May 12th, 2010

Did you know that the United Sustainable Energy Agency has one of its two offices right here in Witney? A not for profit company, they provide services to the public sector, business, and individuals to help them reduce carbon, adapt to climate change and tackle fuel poverty – right on our doorstep.

» Read more: Local £99 Insulation Deal

A Sustainable Society

May 5th, 2010

It turns out that Human Geography isn’t about locating ones navel with a cartesian coordinate system at all. It’s about mapping society, filling in the contours between the Haves and Have-Nots, and identifying the emerging trends.

Professor Danny Dorling has made a career of investigating the human landscape and, speaking last night in The Hollybush, he gave some stark examples of trends which are patently unsustainable; if the life expectancy of women in Kensington and Chelsea continues at it’s present rate they’ll be the first immortal beings on the planet since Mount Olympus was the centre of civilised Europe.

His book ‘Injustice – Why Social Inequality Persists’ puts into societal context the proliferation of groups such as Sustainable Witney. We’re familiar with the environmental arguments, we’re hearing more about the economics, this is the human angle – a must read for any government wishing to resolve “deep social problems”.

Currently available at Policy Press for £13.99